Amazon.com student prime

A non-scholarship–$2000 in textbook savings

Discounted College Textbooks

A slightly used version of this $97 textbook was found for $1 online.

Yesterday’s offer from Amazon.com reminded us that we should probably address one way students can help preserve their tuition funds. We’ve just finished ordering and receiving the textbooks needed for the spring semester. Had we purchased them new, through the school bookstore, they would have cost $340.32, plus tax. We shopped around on the internet, and ended up spending a total of $74.05–a savings of  $266.27. If we multiply that across 8 semesters, it comes to $2,130.16!

How did we do it? Through a variety of ways. Five of the eleven books we ordered were used. All but one turned out to be in pristine condition. The other was worn, but not too badly. To find the used books, we relied on resources such as eBay, Amazon third-party sellers, and Alibris.com. Our biggest savings was on a $97 book that we found for $1 plus $2.95 shipping.

The other six books were new. Five of the new ones came from Amazon.com and one through an auction on eBay. Those from Amazon.com were not taxed and had no shipping charges. Did you know that students can get a free “Prime” account from Amazon for a year which includes free two-day shipping? Check it out!

We actually spent less than our $74.05 total, as we had accumulated four Amazon.com $5 gift certificates from Swagbucks.com. You can get them for free! You earn them simply by doing searches through Swagbucks.com. Theoretically, you could earn enough throughout the year to pay for most of your books.

Another advantage of buying used or discounted books is that when you are finished with them, you can likely sell them for as much or more than you paid for them.

It’s great to be able to support college bookstores, but if it means the difference between being able to stay in school or having to drop out, the choice becomes rather easy.

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Thursday, January 20th, 2011 Homeschool No Comments

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